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Prisons Judo Club

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Santiago Stewart
Santiago Stewart

The Thieves (2012)



A group of thieves get together to steal a diamond from a casino. This movie from South Korea seems very similar to George Clooney's Ocean 11,12, 13 movies. There are many solid scenes in the movie ...including some impressive stunts that happen outside of tall buildings on the windows and ledges.




The Thieves (2012)


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Kim Yun-seok, the ex-copper in The Chaser, plays the thief Macao Park who brings a team of South Korean thieves together with a crew from Hong Kong to steal a diamond necklace from a casino safe in Macau.


The film neatly balances out its sizable, all-star cast, giving each sufficient screen time and a chance to shine. The characters are each individual and fleshed-out pretty well. Leading man, Macao Park (Kim Yoon Suk), is an extremely clever thief that always seems to be one step ahead of everyone else. Popeye (Lee Jung Jae), as the shifty ringleader, brings in Pepsi (Kim Hye Soo), who comes back after being recently released from prison and contributes her expert safe-cracking skills. Park, along with Popeye and Pepsi, are veteran thieves in the Korean team, but have some complicated history between them.


Chewing Gum (Kim Hae Sook) is a delightful presence as the older, straight-talking con artist that wants to retire from the business. Younger additions Yenicall (Jeon Ji Hyun) and Zampano (Kim Soo Hyun), as the wire-walker and rope man respectively, round out the rest of the team. The only notable player from the Hong Kong side is Chen, who is charismatic and sweet as he and Chewing Gum start their own romance. There are secrets, distrust, and betrayal between all of the characters, who each have their own motives. No honor among thieves, as they say.


A team of Korean thieves headed by Popeye (Lee Jung Jae) look to pull off that one big job that will change all of their lives. The target: a gem worth $20million that is housed in a safe at a Macau casino. To complete the job, the Koreans must team up with their Chinese counterparts who are led by suave Chen, but friction is created with the return of Macao Park as the heist mastermind, a famed thief who double-crossed Popeye years prior. The job seems to go without a hitch, yet the owner of the diamond, the mysterious kingpin Wei Hung, is one step ahead of the bi-national alliance and starts to work his way through the thieves with brutal efficiency.


Well Go USA has debuted the first trailer and poster for The Thieves, director Dong-hun Choi's Korean blockbuster that debuts stateside this weekend. Jung-Jae Lee, Hye-su Kim, Gianna Jun, Soo Hyun Kim, and Hae-suk Kim star as five master thieves who attempt to pull of their biggest score yet: the theft of a 318-karat diamond. Take a look at the one-sheet and footage from the highest-grossing Korean movie of all time.


It's the score of their lives - if they can pull it off. Five thieves at the top of their game, and the crew is assembling for their biggest job yet. Popie (Jung-Jae Lee) is the muscle and brains; Pepsee (Hye-su Kim) is the safecracker. Yenicall (Gianna Jun) climbs walls, Zampano (Soo Hyun Kim) is the strategy man, and Chewingum (Hae-suk Kim) is the master of disguise.


But this new score - it's hot. Maybe too hot. But who can resist the Tear of The Sun: a 318-carat diamond, worth 20 million dollars, and locked away in a casino.The vault is impenetrable, the location covered in cops, and everyone knows there's no honor among thieves - especially not the crew Macao Park (Yun-seok Kim), Popie's old partner, has forced their team to work with. As they gear up and stroll into the casino with a plan, skills, and a whole lot of nerve, they quickly learn that avoiding the cops may not be their toughest problem. What's Macao Park's real motive? Who will betray them all? And who will walk away with the diamond?


The Thieves (Korean Title: Dodukdeul/Hangul: 도둑들) is a 2012 South Korean heist movie directed by Dong-hoon Choi. A group of Korean and Chinese thieves are brought together by the enigmatic Macao Park (Yun-seok Kim) to steal a $20 million diamond from the notorious fence Wei Hong in Macau. However, the thieves' separate agendas means that little goes to plan when they actually carry out the robbery, leading to a multinational chase as the thieves fight over the diamond.


It's the score of their lives - if they can pull it off. Five thieves at the top of their game, and the crew is assembling for their biggest job yet. Popie's the muscle and brains, Pepsee's the safecracker. Yenicall climbs walls, Zampano is the strategy man, and Chewingum is the master of disguise. But this new score - it's hot. Maybe too hot. But who can resist the Tear of The Sun: a 318-carat diamond, worth 20 million dollars, and locked away in a casino. The vault is impenetrable, the location covered in cops, and everyone knows there's no honor among thieves - especially not the crew Macao Park, Popie's old partner, has forced their team to work with. As they gear up and stroll into the casino with a plan, skills, and a whole lot of nerve, they quickly learn that avoiding the cops may not be their toughest problem. What's Macao Park's real motive? Who will betray them all? And who will walk away with the diamond?


Two robbers wearing hoods and armed with pickaxes stole precious gems and gold at the California Mining and Minerals Museum in Mariposa. But the thieves didn't get the14-pound giant gold Fricot Nugget.


California investigators searched Monday for thieves who made off with an estimated $2 million in precious gems and gold from a mining museum in the Sierra Nevada foothills during a brazen daytime robbery.


The director-writer, who has many box office hits under his belt including "Tazza: The High Rollers" (2006) and "The Thieves" (2012), said in a press conference in Seoul on Thursday the "Alienoid" is a realization of his childhood imagination.


The thieves are increasingly working from abroad, TIGTA found. In 2011, someone using a single mailing address in Lithuania made more tax filings with fraudulent Social Security numbers than any single U.S. address, TIGTA said.


If you're in the mood for a good detective tale, you're going to enjoy this week's cover story. In it, writer Carson Medley chronicles his efforts to retrieve his stolen sunglasses and iPhone, the latter being the more important of the pilfered items. The phone contained more than 1,000 photos of his new baby and wife, and those precious memories had not been backed up. Medley takes us on his journey, during which he grapples with whether to press charges against the thieves, a couple of Chico State students.


USA TODAY's Byron Acohido says that data thieves have installed corrupt checkout terminals at many stores nationwide to steal customers' personal information. Their methods include some creative ruses. The thieves pose as repairmen to install or fix payment terminals and add skimming devices that pick up debit card numbers and PINs.


those trades are only "bad" to the algorithm owner. they should quit cancelling trades. if the software is not for prime time, it should not be running. investors are going to get stung by flash traders OR lose their profit by the "give me your $" machines. if the algorithm takes your $, that's ok. but we don't want the algorithm owners to lose $. there are other sides of these "erroneous" trades. it's happening in derivatives, which affect underlying assets. the SEC needs to take action ON BEHALF of investors. this is a daily occurrence. there are counterparties to these trades. i have never before heard of a "do over" in stock trading, and, worse, only the thieves get the "do over". what a market!


Initial reports of numbers of compromised records in data security breaches are often underestimated. Such appears to be the case in the Global Payments, Inc. incident that we wrote about last month. Initial reports stated that about 1.5 million credit and debit cards were compromised, but it is now believed that the number is closer to 7 million. New information also reveals that thieves could have had access to customer data since last spring. Global Payments was the nation's seventh largest "merchant acquirer" last year, processing $120.6 billion MasterCard and Visa transactions. 041b061a72


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