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Santiago Stewart
Santiago Stewart

American Psycho 1



In a state of hysteria, Bateman calls Jean, then goes to meet with his colleagues for lunch. Meanwhile, Jean finds detailed, graphic drawings of murder and mutilation in Bateman's office journal. Bateman sees Carnes and mentions the phone message. Carnes mistakes Bateman for another man and laughs off the confession as a joke. Bateman clarifies who he is and again confesses the murders, but Carnes says his claims are impossible since he recently had dinner with Allen in London. A confused Bateman returns to his friends; they discuss dinner reservations and muse about whether Ronald Reagan is a harmless old man or a hidden psychopath. Bateman, unsure if his crimes were real or imaginary, realizes he will never receive the punishment he desires. His narration declares that he is in constant pain, that he wishes his pain inflicted on others, and that his confession means nothing.




American Psycho 1


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Harron and Bale excluded Leto from rehearsals of the murder of Paul Allen so Leto's expression of shock when Bale ran at him with an axe would be genuine. The shots of Bateman swinging his axe at Allen had to be done quickly since the scene's use of theatrical blood limited the number of takes. Bale swung at a Plexiglass-coated camera as the crew squirted fake blood at his face. The blood covered only half of Bale's face by accident, but Harron found this "a perfect metaphor for the Jekyll-and-Hyde aspect of Bateman: pristine on the outside, bloody and psychotic on the inside".[29] Bale improvised Bateman's moonwalk, a change from the novel that Ellis initially disliked, but grew to appreciate over time.[10] For the subsequent interview scenes featuring Donald Kimball, Harron shot three takes and requested that Dafoe act differently in each of them. Dafoe acted as if Kimball knew Bateman was Allen's killer in the first, only suspected him in the second, and did not suspect anything in the third. The three takes were then blended in post-production to confuse audiences.[30]


Bateman insists that his confession was true, but Carnes says Paul Allen isn't dead because he recently had dinner with Allen in London. Confused, Bateman returns to his friends who are musing over whether Ronald Reagan is a harmless old man or a hidden psychopath before discussing their dinner reservations. The lack of acknowledgment drives Bateman further into madness and existential despair. In Patrick Bateman's monologue at the end, he realizes that his confession has meant nothing, and he will never receive the punishment he desires.


This killing doesn't go unnoticed, and immediately Bateman finds himself in first a chase, and then a shootout with the cops. Though he's armed with just a pistol, and is stuck in an open alley way, he is able to actually kill at least two police officers, and even blow up one of the squad cars. This even strikes the titular character as odd, as he actually stares at his gun in disbelief. But this is only just the beginning of his psychotic and violent night.


It is after this point when everything we understood to be true in American Psycho begins to unravel. The body parts that Bateman has been storing in Paul Allen's apartment are gone, and a realtor explains that nobody named Paul Allen actually lived there. Jean (Chloe Sevigny) finds a notebook that seem to be reflections of her boss' psychosis, and we are suddenly left to wonder if it's all just his fantasy. The real bombshell, though, is dropped as Bateman makes his way to the bar to meet with his lawyer.


Admittedly, there is also some ambiguity to the other deaths as well, and while I do believe that he has killed a good number of people (such as the homeless man played by Reg E. Cathey and the prostitutes), it's interesting to note that the movie also provides viewers with a good deal of doubt regarding the extent of Bateman's crimes. The reason why the entire third act is so key to understanding the ending of American Psycho is because it establishes that we are seeing the world through the protagonist's eyes, and nothing is to be trusted. An ATM doesn't actually flash the message "Feed Me A Stray Cat," and Bateman's run from the cops is certainly heightened to the point where you begin to question even the smallest details of the reality. Again, this is just his psychotic imagination flaring up. The extent to which this idea can be applied to the rest of the film is up to individual viewers, but it can swing both ways.


While Bateman goes to meet with his colleagues for lunch, Jean finds detailed drawings of murder and mutilation in Bateman's office journal. Bateman sees Carnes and mentions the phone message. Carnes mistakes Bateman for another colleague and laughs off the confession as a joke. Bateman clarifies who he is and again confesses the murders, but Carnes says his claims are impossible since he recently had dinner with Allen in London. A confused Bateman returns to his friends; they muse whether Ronald Reagan is a harmless old man or hidden psychopath before discussing their dinner reservations. Bateman, unsure if his crimes were imaginary, realizes he will never receive the punishment he desires.


Patrick Bateman (Christian Bale) makes a lot of money in some kind of financial job that doesn't seem to require much work. Instead, he spends time drinking with friends, snorting cocaine, keeping up appearances with his fiancée Evelyn Williams (Reese Witherspoon), sleeping with other women, and -- oh yes -- indulging his psychotic urges to kill people, going so far as to invite prostitutes, and even his loyal secretary (Chloe Sevigny) to his apartment for some deviant behavior. Things take a turn for the worse when a cop (Willem Dafoe) begins investigating the disappearance of one of Patrick's acquaintances. But even then, Patrick can't seem to stop, pursuing his devilish hobby until the breaking point.


The second mandate of TAP is coverage of issues concerning American psychoanalysis as a practice and technique. Societal and government issues that concern psychoanalysis are featured as well as reports from developments in international psychoanalysis. Each edition also includes an in-depth section on a topic of special interest as well as regular columns on politics and public policy, and on psychoanalytic science.


American Psycho debuttò al Sundance Film Festival il 21 gennaio 2000. Il film ricevette critiche positive dal New York Times. Deve la sua celebrità specialmente ai contenuti molto forti, all'umorismo nero e alla rappresentazione dello stile di vita degli yuppies americani degli anni ottanta. Il film ha incassato 34 266 564 $ in tutto il mondo.[2]


I think the film doesn't intend for us to exclude any of these ideas above (even if they conflict with one another). We see many plot contradictions flagrantly displayed not out of carelessness but with an intentional antipositivism. The facts are not as important as the message. I prefer to think Bateman is an illusory representative of that culture as well as a real psychopathic serial killer as well as a spoiled frustrated alpha male with delusions of grandeur and made up violent fantasies. It's like watching Heath ledger in The Dark Knight. Did he get his scars from his dad or were they self inflicted? Is he lying or delusional? The movie has more power for me if I say "all of the above" because these characters are not real and thus they have the advantage of telling multiple stories with parallel lessons. 041b061a72


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