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Luke Edwards
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User Stories Applied by Mike Cohn: The Ultimate Resource for Agile Software Development in PDF and Aufhebungsvertrag Ge



User Stories Applied: A Book Review




If you are looking for a practical and comprehensive guide on how to use user stories for agile software development, you might want to check out User Stories Applied, a book by Mike Cohn.




User Stories Applied Mike Cohn Pdf Download aufhebungsvertrag ge


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Mike Cohn is a well-known expert and author on agile software development, especially on Scrum and XP methodologies. He is also the founder of Mountain Goat Software, a company that provides training and consulting services on agile software development.


In this book, Mike Cohn provides a front-to-back blueprint for writing and using user stories in agile software development. He explains what user stories are, what they are not, how to write them, how to split them, how to combine them, how to prioritize them, how to estimate them, how to test them, and how to track them.


The book is full of examples, exercises, tips, and best practices that will help you master the art of user stories and deliver better software that meets users' needs.


What are user stories?




User stories are simple, clear, brief descriptions of functionality that will be valuable to real users. They are written from the perspective of the user or customer who will benefit from the feature.


User stories are not detailed specifications or requirements that the software must implement. They are reminders to have a conversation between the customer and the development team about the details of the feature.


User stories have many benefits for agile software development. They help you focus on what matters most to your users or customers. They help you avoid unnecessary features or complexity that do not add value. They help you communicate better with your users or customers and get feedback faster. They help you adapt to changing needs and expectations more easily.


How to write user stories?




To write good user stories, you need to follow six attributes that Bill Wake, another agile software development expert, has suggested with the acronym INVEST. A good user story is:


  • Independent: The user story should not depend on other user stories or create dependencies between them. This will make it easier to prioritize, plan, estimate, and test the user stories.



  • Negotiable: The user story should not be a fixed contract or requirement that the software must implement. It should be a placeholder for a conversation between the customer and the development team about the details of the feature.



  • Valuable: The user story should deliver value to the user or customer who will use the feature. It should not be too technical or focused on how the feature will be implemented. It should answer the question: why do we need this feature?



  • Estimatable: The user story should be clear and concise enough that the development team can estimate how much effort and time it will take to implement it. It should not be too vague or too complex.



  • Small: The user story should be small enough that it can be implemented in a short time frame, preferably within one iteration or sprint. It should not be too large or too ambitious.



  • Testable: The user story should have clear and measurable acceptance criteria that can be used to verify that the feature works as expected and meets the user's or customer's needs. It should not be ambiguous or subjective.



To help you write user stories that follow these attributes, you can use a simple template that consists of three parts: As a (type of user), I want (some feature), so that (some benefit). For example:


  • As a job seeker, I want to upload my resume, so that I can apply for jobs online.



  • As an employer, I want to pay for a job posting with a credit card, so that I can attract more candidates.



  • As an administrator, I want to generate reports on the number of job postings and applications, so that I can monitor the performance of the website.



Sometimes, you may need to split a large user story into smaller ones, or combine several small user stories into one larger one. To do this, you can use different techniques such as:


  • Splitting by workflow steps: For example, you can split the user story "As a job seeker, I want to create an account and log in, so that I can access the website features." into two smaller stories: "As a job seeker, I want to create an account, so that I can register on the website." and "As a job seeker, I want to log in, so that I can access the website features."



  • Splitting by scenarios: For example, you can split the user story "As an employer, I want to pay for a job posting with a credit card, so that I can attract more candidates." into three smaller stories: "As an employer, I want to pay for a job posting with a Visa card.", "As an employer, I want to pay for a job posting with a MasterCard.", and "As an employer, I want to pay for a job posting with an American Express card."



  • Splitting by data variations: For example, you can split the user story "As an administrator, I want to generate reports on the number of job postings and applications, so that I can monitor the performance of the website." into two smaller stories: "As an administrator, I want to generate reports on the number of job postings by date and category." and "As an administrator, I want to generate reports on the number of applications by date and status."



  • Combining by common functionality: For example, you can combine the three user stories about paying with different credit cards into one larger story: "As an employer, I want to pay for a job posting with a credit card."



  • Combining by common goal: For example, you can combine the two user stories about creating an account and logging in into one larger story: "As a job seeker, I want to access the website features."



How to use user stories?




User stories are used throughout the agile software development lifecycle for planning, prioritizing, estimating, testing and tracking software projects. Here are some of the main ways user stories are used:


Planning: User stories are used to plan releases and iterations (or sprints) of software development. A release is a set of features that will be delivered to the users or User Stories Applied: A Pdf Download